The Hammond will be CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC for exhibition installation
MAY 15 - MAY 27 and AUGUST 14 - AUGUST 26, 2022

Feel the Peace & Wisdom of Nature at the Hammond

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THE HAMMOND MUSEUM MISSION:

Closed for the season – but still HAPPENING

It's that time of year again. The Hammond Museum’s main gallery and the Japanese Stroll Garden are closed for the winter season. 

Keep up-to-date on news from The Hammond and join our mailing list here.

  • The Board of Trustees is delighted to introduce Melissa Ralston-Jones as the interim executive director to the Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden. Melissa has been selected for her exemplary museum, curatorial, managerial and grant writing experience and credentials. Since mid-December, Melissa has harnessed her twin passions for museum work and as a master gardener to provide an essentialist approach to leadership at a time when the arts are needed more than ever as a place for solace, truth-telling, and replenishment. As the Hammond Museum continues to expand its educational reach to include writing workshops and theater, we are pleased to extend our warmest welcome to Melissa--an educator and strategic thinker who understands the power of art, nature, and creative expression to transform our local and global community.

  • Due to Covid concerns, performances of ‘Canticle (God’s Fool)’ have been postponed to the spring-summer of 2022. Stay tuned for new dates for the world premiere by renowned playwright Martha Clarke, produced by the Schoolhouse Theater. 

  • We will continue to deliver online programs during. Events include book talks, essays, workshops, seminars, and the launch of the Writers' Room.  

See you in early spring for exhibits, cherry blossoms, and Earth Day!

Koichi Yanagi Oriental Fine Arts sold Japanese paintings, ceramics—antique and contemporary—lacquerwares and tea ceremony accouterments to museums throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. A few noteworthy examples from the gallery that are now in American museums include the 16th century Portrait of a Warrior in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a 17th-century lacquer inkstone box (suzuribako) and Maple Leaves on a Stream/Mountain Views by Ikeda Koson, both now in the National Museum of Asian Art, Smithsonian Institution. One of the gallery’s especially interesting sales reunited the Cleveland Museum of Art’s important Kamakura-period sculpture of En no Gyōja with the depictions of Zenki and Koki that originally flanked it.

With deep gratitude the Hammond Museum celebrates the life of Koichi Yanagi (1965-2021)

Renowned dealer Koichi Yanagi passed away in Kyoto on January 17th at the age of 56. Koichi devoted his life to the appreciation of Japanese art and culture throughout the world and facilitated the acquisition of exquisite art objects by highly regarded public and private collectors.

Born in Kyoto on March 3, 1965, Koichi was the son of pre-eminent dealer Yanagi Takashi and so from an early age was surrounded by fine examples of Japanese art. Koichi moved to New York City in his 20s and in 1991 opened Koichi Yanagi Oriental Fine Arts. His third location, at 17 East 71st St., was a refined space that reflected the Japanese preference for natural materials and serene understatement. Their exhibitions were noted for featuring only a few choice items of the highest quality, accompanied by a scholarly catalogue presentation, and displayed with utmost sensitivity and artistry. In addition to being a member of AWNY, the gallery also exhibited with the Japanese Art Dealers Association (JADA).

Koichi Yanagi

Koichi Yanagi in his gallery at 17 E. 71st Street, New York in 2018. Photo courtesy of Julia Meech.

Koichi Yanagi Oriental Fine Arts sold Japanese paintings, ceramics—antique and contemporary—lacquerwares and tea ceremony accouterments to museums throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. A few noteworthy examples from the gallery that are now in American museums include the 16th century Portrait of a Warrior in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a 17th-century lacquer 

inkstone box (suzuribako) and Maple Leaves on a Stream/Mountain Views by Ikeda Koson, both now in the National Museum of Asian Art, Smithsonian Institution. One of the gallery’s especially interesting sales reunited the Cleveland Museum of Art’s important Kamakura-period sculpture of En no Gyōja with the depictions of Zenki and Koki that originally flanked it.

These same museums, and numerous others, were also the recipients of the generosity of Koichi and his wife Yuko Hosomi Yanagi, as they donated many paintings and tea ceremony vessels to, among those institutions listed above and others, the Brooklyn Museum, Princeton Art Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. In 2010, Koichi arranged for the transport and donation of a tea room from Kyoto to the Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden in North Salem, New York, where it was installed in the Hammond’s library.

His passing is a grave loss, and we will miss the creativity and connoisseurship that Koichi brought to his engagement with Japanese art and shared with like-minded friends. The best summation was written by Holland Carter in his review in The New York Times of the gallery’s Spring 2002 exhibition Shinto, “It’s possible that there are more beautiful gallery shows in Manhattan right now than this one, but I haven’t seen any.”

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Koichi Yanagi and other guests, Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden tea room, 2010

The Garden

The Gardens

The Japanese Stroll Garden at the Hammond is a place of natural beauty and tranquility, meant to delight the senses and refresh the spirit. 

The Hammond Japanese Stroll Garden
Revitalization Project

Sixty years after its opening in 1961, the Hammond Garden is in the midst of a 2021 Hammond Japanese Stroll Garden Revitalization Project, funded by a Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership grant. Guided by Charles King Sadler, horticultural and design expert, Hammond volunteers have pruned the crabapples that explode with flowers in spring and droop gracefully over our central pond. We have trimmed our Kwanzan cherries, allowing these beloved trees to form an inviting aisle, but also giving each tree space. Further pruning revealed a nearly hidden stone path in our lantern garden, as Charles Sadler removed lower branches from a Japanese maple and overhanging honeysuckle and demonstrated how to cut back overgrown azaleas naturalistically. The Revitalization Project also includes planning for larger scale changes. New deer-hardy plantings will enhance the hidden and revealed views so important to a Japanese garden and native woodland plantings on the perimeter will contribute to the greater environment of the Hammond and North Salem community.

On November 3, 2021, Hammond Trustee Dr. Lara Netting spoke about the Hammond garden history and revitalization at the North American Japanese Garden Association Biennial Conference in San Diego. Netting NAJGA talk To learn more about NAJGA and its critical work in stewarding Japanese gardens across North America click here: NAJGA

We are deeply grateful to the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership for their support of the Hammond Japanese Stroll Garden Revitalization Project. For further information, please contact Lara Netting at info@hammondmuseum.org

Yann Giguere Showing a Mortice and Tenon

Crafting a Japanese Teahouse with Yann Giguere of Mokuchi Woodworking

The Hammond Garden Revitalization Symposium on September 24, 2021, featured visiting artist Yann Giguere from Mokuchi Woodworking. He demonstrated Japanese-style teahouse construction to an audience of over 60 people. Working with wood samples, hand tools, and humor, Mr. Giguere shared his craft and a few “trade secrets”

A Year of Volunteer Pruning with Ralph Padilla

Throughout 2021, the Hammond Japanese Stroll Garden has been fortunate to receive expert attention from Ralph Padilla, Director of forestry/horticulture, City of Yonkers. Ralph’s weekend work at the Hammond has been entirely volunteer. He has climbed high into evergreens and stooped low to Japanese maples, driven by the joy of shaping trees and garden. From all of us at the Hammond: “Thank you, Ralph!”

Maple and stepping stone path with light snow

Charles King Sadler Pruning  the Crabapples Trees

Podcast

In The Landscape podcast hosts discuss their involvement in the restoration of the Hammond Museum Japanese Stroll Garden in North Salem New York​

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Education at the Hammond!

This section contains essays, lesson plans, and videos related to the Hammond’s mission for educators and students to use. Made possible through the generosity of the Japan Foundation.

VISIT THE HAMMOND

The Museum and Gardens are open to the public during the season between April and November. Visiting hours are 12 pm to 4 pm on Wednesday through Saturday. 


We are open for private events all year

Learn the History

Discover the story of over 60 years of culture, art and natural beauty. Learn the roots of the Hammond and understand its longstanding impact.

BECOME A MEMBER

Free admission, exclusive member events and special opportunities to join the life of the Hammond. Keep the Museum's mission growing by becoming a member.

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PROUD TO BE SUPPORTED BY

ARTSWESTCHESTER
WESTCHESTER COUNTY GOVERNMENT